Archive for the ‘Farm Journal’ Category

Damn Groundhogs

 

Farm Journal – week of

May 14 2017 – May 20 2017  

 

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We had our first groundhog attack this week, it hit the cabbage. David recovered the cabbage with netting; it was covered in the spring to protect the tender seedlings and uncovered when they got bigger so it would be easier to hoe around them and water. Big Mistake! We thought recovering them with netting would work but the damn groundhog found a way under it. Stay tuned for latest report.

 

After harvesting onions for market David tilled the ground and filled the empty space with Roma beans.

 

 

 

The Contenders growing next to them are in full bloom. We should have beans in a few weeks.

The Blackberries are in full bloom as well.

After the Rain

 

Farm Journal – week of

May 7 2017 – May 13 2017  

 

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After several days the rain finally stopped. David started staking the tomato plants. The grass between the rows kept him from sinking in the mud.

 

 

 

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After David put in several, I started to sucker and tie the plants to the stakes.

Here’s Mud in Your Eye!

 

Farm Journal – weeks of

April 16 2017 – May 6 2017  

 

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Several days of rain and six inches of accumulation put a halt to our farming operation. It was a challenge harvesting for our two markets, getting stuck, ankle deep, in the mud.  When the sun finally came out and the land dried up enough to plant we went crazy setting out squash, cucumbers and more tomato seedlings.

Now the forecast is predicting a possible frost or freeze. We have stopped planting for now and have a strategy for protecting the plants we have in the fields. It entails a lot of extra work and worry.

Stay Tuned!

 

 

 

 

 

No Dancing This Week

 

Farm Journal – week of

April 9 2017 – April 15 2017  

 

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David finished planting the Green Giant evergreens along our border and tilled up the old kale bed in anticipation of being out of commission, for a day or two, because of his CT guided ablation procedure he experienced on Tuesday.

 

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He was right! The anesthesia knocked him for a loop and the after procedure pain was more intense than expected.

However, on Friday and Saturday he made up for lost time.

 

 

 

We removed the winter cover from tunnel A and put up a critter barrier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then David weeded the cabbage and planted his 1st rotation of Contender beans.

 

 

 

 

On Saturday David tilled our tomato rows again and I set out about 100 plants. Then David covered them with netting for protection. He also worked up a bed for his Roma beans.

 

Coming Up

 

Farm Journal – week of

April 2 2017 – April 8 2017  

 

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David’s beans are coming up and will be planted out in a few weeks.

He also started some cucumbers and squash for market retail. They are just starting to break the surface.

 

 

 

 

 

The purple cauliflower that survived our coldest days of winter has gone to seed. This plant is an example of survival of the fittest and natural selection at work, with a little help from humans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The tomato seedlings are ready for market and the peas are in full bloom

David bought 15 Green Giant trees from Tim Belcher

of Rolling Meadows Farm and started to plant them.

 

First Blooms

 

Farm Journal – week of

March 26 2017 – April 1 2017  

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First blooms of the new season, rat tail radish and peas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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All of our winter kale went to seed. I pulled up the plants in tunnel C and cut down our open-air patch. David will till it under once the ground dries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The onions are up and the tomato seedlings are doing well.

David added another string to his peas.

Breaking New Ground

 

Farm Journal – week of

March 19 2017 – March 25 2017  

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David worked up five 80′ rows in our new growing area.

The plan is to leave the grass between the crops. In the fall the exposed rows will be sown in rye and the grass rows will be turned and sown with a legume cover crop, which will be turned under next spring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David put in nine 30′ rows of onions in bed B and worked up three rows in the back garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He also put in a small bed for turnips and beets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Turing the compost pile was also on his agenda.